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We strive to make a positive difference in every life we touch. When people succeed in education, employment, and in leading healthy lives, our communities are changed for the better.

With your support, we served more than 10,000 people in our communities last year. None of this is possible without YOU.

 

Individual Donors

Thank you for your generous support of Starbridge and the people we serve!

Robert Acquilano

Mike Andrews

Stan & Barb Antczak

Anne Babcock-Stiner

Gloria Bakker

Merle & Carol Banek

Jeanette Bardell

Lori Barnard-Northrup

Richard Barrington

Robert & Susan Bayley

Gil & Fran Fleming

Peggy Fortune

Colin Garwood

Dave & Cathy Garwood

Mike & Sue Garwood

James G. Gould

Michael Gridley

Mark and Jayne Grillo

Melinda Guereschi

James Hale

David Mauro

Zaida McKeever

Richard McMullen

Jon & Susan McNally

Bruce & Pamela Merkle

Jane Merlo

Kristin Merrick

Daniel Meyers

Betty D. Middlebrook

Amy and Nasos Mihalakas

Nikisha Ridgeway

The Honorable Joseph E. Robach

Deborah Rowe-Jarrett

Jodi Salatti

Victor Salerno

Debra Salmon

Christine Sands

Joanna Sanguedolce

Paula Santiago

Charon Sattler-LeBlanc

Tom & Peggy Beaty

Megan Benjamin

Jean Bezek

Julia Boland

Glenda K. Bondy

Rick Boorman

James Branciforte

Earl Buckley

Linda Burlingame

Gloriela & Peter Burns 

Joan Hausladen

Mr. and Mrs. Douglas Hebert

Rachel Herzog

Glenna Hinkson

Scott & Seneca Hollenbeck

Perry M. Jacobstein

Nancy A. Jarose

Steven A. Jarose and Marvin Ritzenthaler

Jennifer Johnson

Ida Jones

Diane L. & David G. Mohney

Robert & Jane Moore

Vicki Moore

Christina Moyer

Jason and Linde Mull

Stephen Muratore

Lesley Niebel

Marybeth Nowak

Erin O'Brien

Tom O'Connor

Mary Ellen O. Schantz

Stephen & Patricia Schwarz

Jean Sciacchitano

Alan Sheldon

Paul Shew & Paula Silvestrone

Jeffrey Smith

Tom Smithgall

Mr. and Mrs. Shaun Speicher

Krystyna Staub

Brendan & Katie Staub

Mr. and Mrs. Pat Cahill

Michelle Cain

Katie Cannan

Lipika Chablani

Mr. and Mrs. Thomas W. Clark

Kathryn A. Coniglio

Toni Conner

Bethanne Crane

Peter Crean

Matthew Crowley

Elisha Cruz

Marisol Cruz-Vega 

Joseph & Shirley Jung

Donald Kabes

Voula Katsetos-Stratton

Andrew Kay

Theodore Kitze

Marilyn Kraitsik

Ronald & Nancy Kraus

Jeanne Krautwurst

Cindy Kredo

Catherine Kress

Karla Krogstad

Joseph Kruger

 

Terry O'Hare

Jude O'Rourke

Gillian Paku

Corbin Palmer

Walter and Barbara Parkes

Michael Parkes

Melody Pauly

Lori Jeanne Peloquin

Matt Perdue

Ms. Anna Perez

Michelle Perez

John Perry

Joyce Steel

Kyra Stephenson

Lisa and Brian Stephenson

Jack & Angela Stout

Kathleen Strojny

Gary & Darlene Sullivan

Dr. Lia Tinkelman Festenstein

Glenn W. Turner Jr.

Peter Vamvakias

Paul & Lisa Visca

Mr. and Mrs. David Walker

Bonnie Watson

John C. DasFaias

Al & Lauren deGroat

Maggie Dillard

Michael & Carol Duffy

James E. Dziubaty

Jaymie Eden

Laurie Elkins

Peggy England

Lori Englert

Michelle Farrands

Jim & Peg Farrington

David Landon

Mitchell Lehman-Krebs

Georgette Lesnak

Suzanne Lewandoski

Jacquie Liebman

Juanita Lyde

Jennifer Mandarano

Michael Mantione

Rich and Cynthia Mapes

Michele Marinaro

Barb and Jim Maryniak

Nadine Piatt

James Pierce

Colleen Poormon

Dawn Poplawski

Rodney Potter

Maát & Timothy Reed

Joe Regan

James Reid III

Mary Ann Reilley

Mary Richardson

Lynn Richardson

Mr. and Mrs. Thomas Weber

Joyce Weir

Annie Wells

Janet Williams

Michael Wischnowski

Chris Woodworth

Christine Yager

Yu-Ming Zhu

Beth & Brian Zorn

Maryjane A. Zornow

Thank you also to our Anonymous donors. Your support is greatly appreciated!

 

Organizations

Thank you for your generous support of Starbridge and the people we serve!


Al Sigl Community of Agencies

Alesco Advisors

Bank of America

Barclay Damon, LLP

Beacon Solutions

Bonadio Group, CPAs

Brown & Brown of New York, Inc.

Burke Group

CBCS

Center Information Services, Inc.

Charlotte Furniture and Appliances

eVero Corporation

Faraci Lange Attorneys

Genesis Pediatrics, LLC

Holley Pharmacy

iuvo Bioscience

Key Bank

Lifetime Assistance, Inc.

MediSked, LLC

Mengel, Metzger, Barr & Co. LLP

Monroe Wheelchair

O'Connell Electric Company, Inc.

People, Inc.

Ridge Pavement Marking, Inc.

St. John Fisher College

Stokes, Visca & Company, LLP

Toshiba Business Solutions

Wegmans Food Markets, Inc.

 

 

Foundations

Thank you for your generous support of Starbridge and the people we serve!

Alstom Signaling Foundation

ESL Federal Credit Union

Feinbloom Supporting Foundation

Gannett Foundation

Kyrias Foundation, Inc.

Suzanne Lee Trust

Lyft Wheels For All

J.M. McDonald Foundation, Inc.

Dolores & Philip Neivert Fund

Pluta Family Foundation Inc.

The Polisseni Foundation

Waldron Rise Foundation

Fred & Floy Willmott Foundation

Wyman-Potter Foundation

 

Memorial and Honor Gifts

Thank you for your generous support of Starbridge and the people we serve!

Gifts in Honor

In honor of Nathaniel Fell-DeWalt

Elizabeth Fell-DeWalt

In honor of Kathy Giordano

Dr. and Mrs. Stuart B. Sacks

In honor of Steven Moore

Beverly Moore

In honor of the Starbridge IRA Teams

Alan & Suzanne Posner

Teresa M. Robach

 

Gifts in Memoriam

In memory of William J. Janawitz

Genevieve Janawitz
 



Gifts in Kind

Thank you for your generous support of Starbridge and the people we serve!

5 o'Clock Somewhere Wine/Liquor, LLC

A Little off the Top Salon & Spa

Albright-Knox Art Gallery

Laura Arrington

Anne Babcock-Stiner

Bad Apples Bistro

Lori Barnard-Northrup

Black & Blue Steak & Crab

Black Button Distilling

Buffalo Bills

Century Liquor and Wines

CHM Liquors

Comedy @ The Carlson

Mary Coy

Matthew Crowley

Michael Darcy

Darien Lake

Jerome Davis

Lauren deGroat

Delmonico's Italian Steakhouse

Delta Sonic

Desiato's Deli & Subs

Dogtown

Downstairs Cabaret Theatre

James E. Dziubaty

Elmgrove Wine and Spirits

Faraci Lange Attorneys

Dr. Lia Tinkelman Festenstein & David Festenstein

Fioravanti Florist

Fleet Feet Sports

Flower City Yoga

Fort Hill Liquor

Colin Garwood

Genesee Brewery

George Eastman House

Scott & Seneca Hollenbeck

Hovey Street Liquor

Knot Your Father's Ties

Marilyn Kraitsik

David Landon

Lisa's Liquor Barn

LJ Design by Linda

Locust Hill Country Club

Long Acre Farms

Marketview Liquor

Marsh Creek Metalworks

Memorial Art Gallery

Amy and Nasos Mihalakas

Robert & Jane Moore

Tina Motiwala

Mike Paolotto

Joseph Pardi

Park Ave Salon & Day Spa

Walter and Barbara Parkes

Matt Perdue

Pet Spa Paws & Play

Pinnacle Wine & Liquor

The Pita Pit

Mary Richardson

Cheryl Riley

Ritual Salon

Rochester Knighthawks

Rochester Museum and Science Center

Rochester Philharmonic Orchestra

Rochester Red Wings

Rock Ventures

Steve Rossi

Joanna Sanguedolce

Stephen Schwarz

Jean Sciacchitano

Seabreeze Amusement Park

Alan Sheldon

Michael Slattery

Sonnenberg Gardens & Mansion State Historic Park

Mary Beth Speicher

Katie Staub

Krystyna Staub

Joyce Steel

Lisa & Brian Stephenson

The Strathallan

Supercuts

Swain Resort

Swiftwater Brewery

Tantalo Photography

Tony D's

Voula's Greek Sweets

Wegmans Food Markets, Inc.

Annie Wells

Xerox Rochester International Jazz Festival

Zweigle's, Inc.

 

 


Four adult women of diverse races holding certificates of completion from a Starbridge workshop series 

Starbridge provides interactive, informative, and inspiring ways for you to build knowledge and develop skills.

Looking for a scheduled training?

View our online calendar to find currently scheduled events.

Want to schedule a workshop for your group?
  1. Review the workshop list below or download a pdf of our current workshop catalog
  2. To schedule a training for family members and people who have disabilities, contact Laura Arrington, Parent Center Coordinator, by phone at 585-224-7332 or email larrington@starbridgeinc.org.
  3. To schedule a training for a school, business, or organization, contact Joyce Steel, Director of Family Advocacy, by phone at 585-224-7334 or email jsteel@starbridgeinc.org.

Starbridge's Signature Series

Building Bridges: Awareness • Inclusion • Empowerment

Building Bridges in Organizations

The latest US Census estimates that nearly 1 in 5 Americans have some form of disability. People who have disabilities, their families, and their friends are more likely to shop at, dine at, or engage the services of businesses that are truly accessible and inclusive. In addition, businesses that are flexible and open to employing the talents of all individuals, including those with disabilities, promote a workplace culture of collaboration and success.

Staff at Starbridge are experts in understanding disabilities and in working with groups in a positive, engaging fashion to help them see that we are all people first. Let us come in and help your employees or group members to:

  • Develop an understanding of disabilities and how they affect everyday life
  • Improve comfort level and skills in working or interacting with people who have disabilities
  • Understand definitions of and ways to accomplish reasonable accommodations and accessibility

Creating Connections student quote

Building Bridges in Schools

Schools strive to provide quality instruction in a school environment that is tolerant, respectful, and inclusive. Positive Behavioral Interventions and Supports (PBIS) and bullying prevention programs are critical to the development of that environment. Building Bridges supports PBIS and the Dignity for All Students Act (DASA) while fostering awareness and sensitivity to include all students.

Staff at Starbridge are experts in understanding disabilities and in working with groups in a positive, engaging fashion to help them see that we are all people first. Let us come in and help your students to:

  • Develop an understanding of disabilities and how they affect everyday life
  • Identify the qualities of a good friend, while building acceptance
  • Understand the value of making connections and being supportive in classroom, peer group, and community settings

Creating A Life After High School

workshop attendees 2Creating a Life After High School is a five-session exploration program designed for youth and their families. Registration is open to all students in Monroe County NY, ages 15-21, who are living at home and who have established DDRO eligibility.

The series provides a safe and encouraging environment in which each student is able to practice their self-advocacy skills and find their voice as they begin planning for life after high school. The individuality of each student is valued and encouraged throughout the sessions.

Presenters will help students to identify key points in planning for their future. The information presented will help answer the many questions students and family members have as students enter the adult world. At the end of this program, participants can apply for funds that will be used to support their future vision.

Note: Creating a Life After High School is funded by a grant to provide this series for students with established DDRO eligibility in Monroe County.

Family Empowerment Series

The Family Empowerment Series (formerly known as Lay Advocacy) is a multi-session training series offered each year by Starbridge in various locations in the Finger Lakes and Western New York regions. This series prepares families and caregivers to better advocate within the educational system for their children, and to be resources for other families of students who have disabilities in their communities. This series is open to all families of children who have disabilities and suspected disabilities.workshop attendees 7

 

Full list of topics (English versions)

ABLE Accounts

The ABLE Act allows people with disabilities to establish a tax-advantaged savings account that can be used to pay for qualified disability expenses such as (but not limited to) housing, transportation and education. People who receive SSI and/or SSDI may find this workshop useful since the $2,000 resource limit for Medicaid eligibility does not apply to ABLE account balances. Join us to learn more about ABLE accounts from a state and national perspective.

Advocacy

Advocacy Steps: The Essentials

Advocacy is the act of problem-solving with a purpose and a goal. A parent might engage in advocacy on behalf of their child; people who have a disability may advocate for themselves; a teacher may advocate on behalf of a student; groups of people may join forces in systemic advocacy efforts to change laws or policies. A step-by-step approach can guide us toward the desired outcome, regardless of the circumstance or scope. Participants will learn how to build a solid foundation of team members. Hands-on activities will reinforce the advocacy steps that lead to successful outcomes. 

Advocacy Steps and Effective Communication

Do you come away from meetings not saying what you intended or feeling as though your viewpoint is misunderstood? Do you listen to what other team members say? How do you respond? Communication is key to effective partnerships. Learn to recognize the barriers in communication that can get in the way of collaboration and positive outcomes. Strengthen your advocacy skills by learning effective and collaborative communication strategies. 

Advocacy Steps and Effective Team Meetings

Good meetings don’t happen without practice and planning. This interactive workshop highlights collaborative strategies to help reduce adversarial situations at meetings. How do you respond to conflict? You will discuss ways to identify good and bad conflict and learn three styles of response to conflict. Learn proven problem-solving skills that acknowledge concerns and ideas of all team members. Attend your next meeting with a positive approach and expect greater productivity. 

Ask the Advocate

This workshop provides a unique opportunity to hear a Starbridge advocate’s perspective on the special education process, disability services, or other related topics. This is designed to be an open forum in which participants ask questions in a group setting. 

Attitude of Gratitude: Improving Your Advocacy Outcomes

The expression of gratitude can have a positive influence in your life and in the lives of others with whom you interact. Presenters will share what research reveals on the relationship between gratitude practices and both mental and physical well-being. Participants will learn how optimism can be used to navigate difficult situations and improve advocacy outcomes. 

Creating Your Advocacy Notebook

An advocacy notebook is an indispensable tool for every educational team member, especially families and educators. Combining individual vision, family input, educational recommendations and professional references creates a powerful springboard to advocate for your student. This workshop provides participants with the skills, knowledge, and resources to maintain the documentation and records needed for effective advocacy. Participants will leave equipped with a notebook, handouts, reproducible forms, correct educational and legal terms, and greater confidence in communicating with the whole team. 

Developing a Vision

It is sometimes difficult to articulate the dreams we hold for ourselves or for our children and students who have disabilities. Take this time to begin developing a vision for yourself, your child or your student. Where do you see yourself or your child living? Working? Spending leisure hours? Our presenters will guide you along this exciting journey and may help you to consider options you had not thought of before. You will leave this workshop seeing possibilities for yourself, your child or your student. 

Developing Your Child’s Portfolio

A portfolio is a visual representation that can be used to introduce a child to any professional. Photos and concise text illustrate a child’s strengths, family, hobbies, interests, and “things you should know about them.” Participants start with a vision statement and develop a portfolio as part of this interactive, hands-on workshop. Educators who have received portfolios have commented that they would like a portfolio for every student! 

Families as Advocates: Your Role at the Committee on Special Education

This workshop is designed to help families strengthen their role as advocates in their child’s Committee on Special Education (CSE) meetings and processes. Join us as we discuss the purpose of a CSE meeting, effective communication strategies, and ways to enhance your advocacy skills. 

Family Involvement

Research shows that when families are engaged, students have higher grades, test scores, and graduation rates; better school attendance; increased motivation; better self-esteem; and, lower rates of suspension. This workshop provides participants with the tools to develop a positive and collaborative relationship between families and schools. Participants will learn skills for effective communication and strategies to support educational success at home and in school. 

The Importance of Self-Advocacy for Your Child

Self-advocacy is the act of speaking up for yourself to protect your right to direct your own life, including your interests and needs. Families can help their children develop advocacy skills from a young age. This workshop will teach families strategies to ensure their child’s voice will be heard throughout their life. 

Managing the Move: Preparing for Next Year

Moving from one school year to the next can be challenging for children, families and their school team members. This workshop will provide families and school team members with strategies to help promote a seamless transition and lay the groundwork for a positive start to the new school year. 

Behavioral Supports

Building Healthy Relationships through Prosocial Behaviors

Teaching youth who have disabilities about sexuality is important in promoting independence, personal safety, healthy lifestyles, healthy relationships, and social inclusion. Families, guardians and professionals will leave this workshop with the information and confidence they need to address the topic of sexuality with children, teens, or young adults who have disabilities. 

Bullying: Intervention Strategies

Bullying is an increasingly serious problem in schools. Families, teachers, and children need help and support in knowing how to respond. This workshop introduces participants to definitions of bullying, how to recognize it, and how to respond to it both at home and in school.

This workshop can be offered in a one- or two-hour format.

Functional Behavioral Assessments and Behavior Intervention Plans

Sometimes a child’s behaviors interfere with learning. Students and teachers need strategies to minimize those behaviors and to maximize learning opportunities. This workshop will explore the nature of a child’s behavior and when a Functional Behavior Assessment (FBA) should be requested. An FBA helps to determine why a student engages in behaviors that impede learning. We will share tools and strategies to support student success, and what types of supports and services might be needed. 

Guide Boards: Tools and Strategies to Effectively Guide Appropriate Social Interactions

Guide boards are valuable tools to support appropriate social interactions. They assist a person with a disability in expressing a need or emotion. Participants will begin to create guide boards to support individuals in their communication and to assist with transitions. 

School Avoidance Issues

Anxiety is a natural part of childhood, but when anxiety gets in the way of a child’s ability to learn, families may need support and services through the Committee on Special Education. Learn how to collaborate with your child’s school and what supports and services may be available through school for a child who has anxiety. 

Understanding and Supporting Children with Challenging Behaviors

Behavior in all forms, such as facial expressions and body language, can convey messages. This workshop will explore the nature of a child’s behavior, some possible root causes, and strategies to promote positive behaviors. We will look at various supports and services available through school and in the community, and discuss options for when more support is needed. 

Circles of Support

Attitude of Gratitude: Improving Your Advocacy Outcomes

The expression of gratitude can have a positive influence in your life and in the lives of others with whom you interact. Presenters will share what research reveals on the relationship between gratitude practices and both mental and physical well-being. Participants will learn how optimism can be used to navigate difficult situations and improve advocacy outcomes. 

Balance and Wellness for Caregivers and Professionals

Caregivers and professionals in the human services field can benefit from real, honest conversations about the personal impacts of providing care and support to a person who has a disability. Learn to recognize and reduce stressors, as well as increase self-awareness about your role and responsibilities. The goal is to create more balance and resilience so we can continue to give our best to those we love and support. 

Boundaries: A Family Guide

Are you passionate about supporting others through challenges and difficult times? Setting clear personal boundaries is the key to ensuring relationships are mutually respectful, supportive and caring. This workshop provides information about the importance of establishing boundaries when helping others to achieve their goals or working with your own team. 

Building Circles of Support

Imagine a group of hand-picked individuals gathered to help a person who has a disability to accomplish their personal vision. How do we make that a reality? This workshop shows the value of a circle of support, how to form that circle, and strategies for making the circle effective. 

Family Involvement

Research shows that when families are engaged, students have higher grades, test scores, and graduation rates; better school attendance; increased motivation; better self-esteem; and, lower rates of suspension. This workshop provides participants with the tools to develop a positive and collaborative relationship between families and schools. Participants will learn skills for effective communication and strategies to support educational success at home and in school. 

Communication and Partnerships

ABCs of a School Meeting

Family members and professionals are invited to attend a variety of school meetings. The ultimate goal is for the family and school to work together for the benefit of the child's education. Participants in this workshop will learn how to get the most out of a meeting and how to be an involved team member before, during, and after a meeting. Presenters will also share suggestions on essential characteristics for strong partnerships, such as being prepared and knowledgeable. 

Advocacy Steps and Effective Communication

Do you come away from meetings not saying what you intended or feeling as though your viewpoint is misunderstood? Do you listen to what other team members say? How do you respond? Communication is key to effective partnerships. Learn to recognize the barriers in communication that can get in the way of collaboration and positive outcomes. Strengthen your advocacy skills by learning effective and collaborative communication strategies. 

Advocacy Steps and Effective Team Meetings

Good meetings don’t happen without practice and planning. This interactive workshop highlights collaborative strategies to help reduce adversarial situations at meetings. How do you respond to conflict? You will discuss ways to identify good and bad conflict and learn three styles of response to conflict. Learn proven problem-solving skills that acknowledge concerns and ideas of all team members. Attend your next meeting with a positive approach and expect greater productivity. 

Baggage

Is all that “baggage” weighing you down? Could your conversations, meetings, vision, and progress be hampered by baggage? This workshop demonstrates how you can recognize personal history as a barrier to effective working relationships. Using a lighthearted approach to a serious topic, our presenters share ways to lift baggage out of the way to make room for real progress at parent-teacher conferences, Committee on Special Education meetings, Life Plan conferences, staff meetings, and other professional gatherings. 

Boundaries: A Family Guide

Are you passionate about supporting others through challenges and difficult times? Setting clear personal boundaries is the key to ensuring relationships are mutually respectful, supportive and caring. This workshop provides information about the importance of establishing boundaries when helping others to achieve their goals or working with your own team. 

CSE/CPSE Parent Member: The Essentials

What is the role of a Parent Member on the Committee on Special Education or Preschool Education (CSE/CPSE)? This training introduces the role of Parent Member and offers strategies to help you become an effective partner in the process. Learn best practices of the CSE/CPSE process and ways to effectively support a family during the meeting. 

Disability Disclosure

Why tell others about your child's disability or your own disability? Sharing information about a disability and how it affects you or your family member helps to provide an understanding of that person and will help eliminate guesswork and assumptions made by family, friends, community members, or professionals. Disclosure may open doors to better communication and understanding in both personal and professional relationships. Families will explore why, when, where, and how to tell others about a child's disability. Self-advocates will learn that disclosing to others may help them recognize their strengths and gain skills and support. Participants will leave with a sampling of tools designed to facilitate disclosure. 

Working Effectively with Families

When a person’s family is a central part of their life, professionals supporting that person need to understand and work effectively with both the person and their family. Discovering and respecting a family’s unique relationships, values, communication style, and cultural background can help build collaboration and improve outcomes for the person who has a disability. Through interactive exercises and discussions, participants will gain an understanding of one family’s experience and learn how they can work more effectively with families. 

Education

Attendance Matters

Did you know that only 17% of students who were chronically absent in Kindergarten and 1st grade are able to read on grade level after 3rd grade? There is a direct connection between chronic absence and students’ academic achievement, especially for students who have disabilities. Every minute in school matters. Families, join us as we explore strategies to overcome barriers that may be getting in the way of getting your child to school. 

Bilingual Program: An Overview

Bilingual education in schools helps students learn English while continuing classes in other academic areas, such as science and math, in their native language. This workshop provides insight into the initial process of identifying a student as an “English language learner” or “Limited English Proficiency” learner. It also provides an overview of the different components of a Bilingual Program. 

Committee on Special Education Overview

The Committee on Special Education (CSE) is responsible for developing a child’s Individualized Education Program (IEP) through a process which involves the student and family. This workshop will explain the purpose of the CSE, the required members, and the family’s role on the committee. Participants will learn strategies for effective advocacy with the CSE. 

Common Core: Unpacking the Learning Standards

The Common Core Learning Standards are a set of national guidelines that have been adopted by New York State. These standards are designed to ensure that students graduating from high school are prepared to enter college or the workforce. This workshop provides a foundation for conversations you can have with your school around the Common Core and how it impacts your child’s education. 

Continuum of Services

Special education is a service, not a place. A variety of placements and related services are available to provide an appropriate education for students who have disabilities. Learn about the process used to determine special education placement and services. Explore the many educational options available and varying configurations of those options. Learn the answers to questions like: What is a consultant teacher? What is a self-contained classroom? What does 12:1:3 mean? What supports can help a student who has a disability to succeed in a general education classroom? 

CSE/CPSE Parent Member: The Essentials

What is the role of a Parent Member on the Committee on Special Education or Preschool Education (CSE/CPSE)? This training introduces the role of Parent Member and offers strategies to help you become an effective partner in the process. Learn best practices of the CSE/CPSE process and ways to effectively support a family during the meeting. 

Disability Disclosure

Why tell others about your child's disability or your own disability? Sharing information about a disability and how it affects you or your family member helps to provide an understanding of that person and will help eliminate guesswork and assumptions made by family, friends, community members, or professionals. Disclosure may open doors to better communication and understanding in both personal and professional relationships. Families will explore why, when, where, and how to tell others about a child's disability. Self-advocates will learn that disclosing to others may help them recognize their strengths and gain skills and support. Participants will leave with a sampling of tools designed to facilitate disclosure. 

Discipline and Suspension: Understanding the Rights of Students with Disabilities

Did you know there is a difference between general discipline procedures and discipline procedures for students who have disabilities? Children who have disabilities have specific rights under state and federal laws when it comes to suspensions and school discipline. This workshop will provide an overview of these rights and the process used for discipline and suspensions. Participants will learn about Functional Behavioral Assessments and how to create a proactive behavior management plan to help avoid future conflict. 

Functional Behavioral Assessments and Behavior Intervention Plans

Sometimes a child’s behaviors interfere with learning. Students and teachers need strategies to minimize those behaviors and to maximize learning opportunities. This workshop will explore the nature of a child’s behavior and when a Functional Behavior Assessment (FBA) should be requested. An FBA helps to determine why a student engages in behaviors that impede learning. We will share tools and strategies to support student success, and what types of supports and services might be needed. 

IDEA: An Overview

Children who have disabilities are entitled to appropriate, individualized, educational services that meet their unique learning needs. This workshop will explain the history and provisions of the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act (IDEA) and the Family Education Rights and Privacy Act (FERPA), two federal laws that govern education for students with disabilities. Families, educators, and human service professionals will learn about children’s rights, how children qualify for special education services, and how these services may be delivered. 

Individualized Education Programs: The Essentials

When a child qualifies for special education services, federal law requires the development of a document called an Individualized Education Program (IEP). The IEP serves as a roadmap for services, including important information about a child’s levels of performance and needs, as well as goals for the child. This workshop will prepare participants to actively participate on the IEP team. 

Individualized Education Programs: Identifying Effective Goals

When developing a student’s IEP for the annual review, it is important for team members to work in collaboration to develop the IEP goals. This workshop will review guidelines used for identifying and writing effective goals that make sense for the student. 

Overview of 504 Plan

The 504 Plan has its origin in Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act. According to this federal law, no one who has a disability can be excluded from participating in federally-funded programs or activities, including elementary, secondary or post-secondary schooling. A 504 Plan provides the modifications and accommodations that students need to have an opportunity to participate with their peers. 

Pathways to Graduation

Learn what “pathways to graduation” are available for students who have disabilities in New York State. What does each diploma, credential, and certificate offer for a student’s future? What is the difference between a local diploma, a Regents diploma, and a Skills and Achievement Commencement Credential? This workshop will help you and your student make informed decisions regarding school, placement, and services. 

Preparing for the Annual Review

An annual review is a Committee on Special Education (CSE) meeting to plan for the next school year. This workshop will help families and educators prepare for annual reviews. Topics to be covered include pre-meeting preparation, development of an Individualized Education Program, and tips to help families and educators collaborate in designing an appropriate program for a student. 

RTI, 504 and IEP: What’s It All About?

When a child qualifies for special education services, federal law requires the development of a document called an Individualized Education Program (IEP). Some students may not qualify for an IEP, but may receive accommodations and modifications from a 504 Plan or may receive support through Response to Intervention (RTI). This workshop will explain the process for receiving supports and services through general and/or special education. 

School Avoidance Issues

Anxiety is a natural part of childhood, but when anxiety gets in the way of a child’s ability to learn, families may need support and services through the Committee on Special Education. Learn how to collaborate with your child’s school and what supports and services may be available through school for a child who has anxiety. 

Simulated CSE Meeting

The Committee on Special Education (CSE) is a formal group that meets to develop recommendations for students who have disabilities. The process can be confusing and overwhelming for all involved. Wouldn’t it be great to practice your participation with experienced facilitators who can help you to avoid pitfalls? This workshop provides an opportunity for participants to simulate a CSE meeting with Starbridge presenters. Through role-playing, participants learn communication and advocacy techniques which can be employed at real CSE meetings and in other similar situations. 

Employment

Disability Disclosure

Why tell others about your child's disability or your own disability? Sharing information about a disability and how it affects you or your family member helps to provide an understanding of that person and will help eliminate guesswork and assumptions made by family, friends, community members, or professionals. Disclosure may open doors to better communication and understanding in both personal and professional relationships. Families will explore why, when, where, and how to tell others about a child's disability. Self-advocates will learn that disclosing to others may help them recognize their strengths and gain skills and support. Participants will leave with a sampling of tools designed to facilitate disclosure. 

Getting and Keeping the First Job

Getting a job is an important rite of passage for most youth and adults. Employment provides a means to earn wages, but it also provides a social network, an opportunity to share and grow in professional interests, and a common purpose in accomplishing a business or organizational goal. This workshop will help families and professionals understand the realities of employment for all youth. Presenters will discuss strategies that youth who have disabilities can use to improve employment prospects. Topics include the importance of work, self-awareness, career planning, family support, possible pitfalls and disability disclosure. 

Increasing Awareness

Early Intervention Services Overview

Families of infants and toddlers who have disabilities or suspected disabilities can access a variety of supports and services, including assistance with diagnosis, through the Early Intervention program administered by the NYS Department of Health. Who refers a child for services? How do you determine if a child has a delay? What does a child need, how often, and who works with the child to improve their areas of need? This workshop will provide information about the Early Intervention process. 

Inclusion: Philosophy and Practice

Can you imagine feeling out of place or unwelcome at home, school, at the gym, movies, or on the playground? At every age and stage, we all need to feel we belong. This workshop explores community inclusion from infancy through adulthood. Presenters will facilitate an open forum on how to find and choose appropriate inclusive community activities for all ages. The group will also discuss educational inclusion and least restrictive environment (LRE) by tracing one family’s journey. 

Team Up for Positive Change

Team Up for Positive Change aims to change attitudes and promote inclusion. This innovative multi-part program connects people who have disabilities and their families with college students, teachers, doctors, and community groups.

In the first part of the program, participants learn or improve presentation skills so that they may better share their disability-related story with others. In the second part of the program, each participant collaborates with a future educator for one semester. After the participant shares their story, the student will interview the participant or family to find out more about their area of need. Students spend the semester researching their topic. At the end of the semester, the student will present their research back to the class and the participants.

Medical Needs

Navigating the Maze: School and Your Child with Medical Needs

Children with medical needs, such as diabetes, seizures, or allergies, require collaboration between home, school, and medical professionals to successfully participate in school. Their unique medical and educational needs can be met when school staff and parents work together with medical professionals to develop appropriate plans. This workshop will acquaint participants with Individuals with Disabilities Education Act (IDEA), Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA), and Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act. 

Person-Centered Approach and Planning

Building Circles of Support

Imagine a group of hand-picked individuals gathered to help a person who has a disability to accomplish their personal vision. How do we make that a reality? This workshop shows the value of a circle of support, how to form that circle, and strategies for making the circle effective. 

Developing a Vision

It is sometimes difficult to articulate the dreams we hold for ourselves or for our children and students who have disabilities. Take this time to begin developing a vision for yourself, your child or your student. Where do you see yourself or your child living? Working? Spending leisure hours? Our presenters will guide you along this exciting journey and may help you to consider options you had not thought of before. You will leave this workshop seeing possibilities for yourself, your child or your student. 

Developing Your Child’s Portfolio

A portfolio is a visual representation that can be used to introduce a child to any professional. Photos and concise text illustrate a child’s strengths, family, hobbies, interests, and “things you should know about them.” Participants start with a vision statement and develop a portfolio as part of this interactive, hands-on workshop. Educators who have received portfolios have commented that they would like a portfolio for every student! 

Disability Disclosure

Why tell others about your child's disability or your own disability? Sharing information about a disability and how it affects you or your family member helps to provide an understanding of that person and will help eliminate guesswork and assumptions made by family, friends, community members, or professionals. Disclosure may open doors to better communication and understanding in both personal and professional relationships.

Families will explore why, when, where, and how to tell others about a child's disability. Self-advocates will learn that disclosing to others may help them recognize their strengths and gain skills and support. Participants will leave with a sampling of tools designed to facilitate disclosure. 

Getting and Keeping the First Job

Getting a job is an important rite of passage for most youth and adults. Employment provides a means to earn wages, but it also provides a social network, an opportunity to share and grow in professional interests, and a common purpose in accomplishing a business or organizational goal. This workshop will help families and professionals understand the realities of employment for all youth. Presenters will discuss strategies that youth who have disabilities can use to improve employment prospects. Topics include the importance of work, self-awareness, career planning, family support, possible pitfalls and disability disclosure. 

Planning for the Future: Guardianship, Trusts, and Shared Decision-Making

Families of children who have disabilities need to think about how important decisions – from finances to health care to living arrangements – will be made as their child becomes an adult. Which one is right for your family? Only you can decide. Join us for a discussion about current legal methods of planning for the future. 

Self-Directed Services

What are the Opportunities? Putting Together the Pieces in Self-Directed Services

This workshop highlights the opportunities Self-Directed Services provide to individuals and families through managing their own budgets, hiring their own staff, developing their own person-centered plans, and implementing those plans. Hear directly from individuals with disabilities and family members about their experiences with Self-Directed Services. 

Transitions

Building Healthy Relationships through Pro-Social Behaviors

Teaching youth who have disabilities about sexuality is important in promoting independence, personal safety, healthy lifestyles, healthy relationships, and social inclusion. Families, guardians and professionals will leave this workshop with the information and confidence they need to address the topic of sexuality with children, teens, or young adults who have disabilities. 

Getting and Keeping the First Job

Getting a job is an important rite of passage for most youth and adults. Employment provides a means to earn wages, but it also provides a social network, an opportunity to share and grow in professional interests, and a common purpose in accomplishing a business or organizational goal. This workshop will help families and professionals understand the realities of employment for all youth. Presenters will discuss strategies that youth who have disabilities can use to improve employment prospects. Topics include the importance of work, self-awareness, career planning, family support, possible pitfalls and disability disclosure. 

Managing the Move: Preparing for Next Year

Moving from one school year to the next can be challenging for children, families and their school team members. This workshop will provide families and school team members with strategies to help promote a seamless transition and lay the groundwork for a positive start to the new school year. 

MOVE: My Options, Vocation & Education

It’s my MOVE now! This half- or full-day conference helps students who have disabilities and their families plan for life after high school. The student’s vision for living, working, and learning after high school should be the guiding philosophy that drives the planning as they transition to adult life and services. Topics covered during the conference include: Transition; Creating a Vision for the Future; Transition in the IEP; and Pathways to Graduation. 

Pathways to Graduation

Learn what “pathways to graduation” are available for students who have disabilities in New York State. What does each diploma, credential, and certificate offer for a student’s future? What is the difference between a local diploma, a Regents diploma, and a Skills and Achievement Commencement Credential? This workshop will help you and your student make informed decisions regarding school, placement, and services. 

Promoting Graduation

Graduating from high school is a significant milestone for all students, including students who have disabilities. Families have an important role in supporting a student’s achievement in school. This workshop will provide family members with strategies and information that will help them support their children. It will also provide information about national dropout rates, New York State graduation rates, and warning signs of a student disengaging from studies. 

Transition 101: From High School to Adulthood

Every student who has an Individualized Education Program (IEP) and is at least 15 years old should have a Transition Plan. Participants at this workshop will learn about the Transition process, which is designed to incrementally prepare students to live, learn, and work in the community by building career and life skills, knowledge and experiences. Presentations may include personal perspectives shared by people who have disabilities and family members. 

Transition 201: Beyond the Basics

Does the adult life plan for your student include employment, college, volunteer options, or other opportunities? What skills, experience, and knowledge will your student need before this transition? This workshop will review the basics of the Transition process and help you and your student explore their adult life options. 

Transition from Early Intervention to Preschool

For many families, moving from Early Intervention services to preschool is the first transition of services for their child. Being informed can lead to a smooth and easy transition. This workshop will discuss the emotional impact on families, how to best prepare for the transition, and the differences between Early Intervention (EI) and the Committee on Preschool Special Education (CPSE). This workshop will give participants the tools to be effective members of a child’s educational team. 

Transition from Preschool to School-Age Services

For any parent with a child going off to kindergarten, it is a time of excitement and anxiety. For families of children who have disabilities, it can also be confusing and nerve-wracking. Participants will learn the differences between the Committee on Preschool Special Education (CPSE) and the Committee on Special Education (CSE) and learn strategies to work effectively with the educational team. Topics include: Individualized Education Program (IEP), Least Restrictive Environment (LRE), and service delivery options. 

Welcome to My CSE

Your child’s vision is written ‒ now what? How do you get their school teams to buy into the vision? This workshop will provide information and tools to assist in making your student’s vision real to their team through a short but powerful presentation. 

What Are the Opportunities? Putting Together the Pieces in Self-Directed Services

This workshop highlights the opportunities Self-Directed Services provide to individuals and families through managing their own budgets, hiring their own staff, developing their own person-centered plans, and implementing those plans. Hear directly from individuals with disabilities and family members about their experiences with Self-Directed Services. 

 

Talleres en Español

workshop attendees 4

Abogacía (Advocacy)

Comunicación Efectiva

¿Sale de las reuniones de educación o de las reuniones con el personal sin expresar sus intenciones? ¿O siente como si su punto de vista es mal entendido? ¿Escucha lo que dicen los otros miembros del equipo? ¿Cómo responde?

La comunicación es la clave para la colaboración efectiva. Los participantes fortalecerán sus habilidades de colaboración al aprender las estrategias de comunicación. Los temas incluyen las expresiones verbales y no verbales, los estilos de comunicación, y la formación de equipos. 

Desarrollo de una Visión

Algunas veces es difícil articular los sueños que tenemos para nosotros mismos o para nuestros hijos y estudiantes con discapacidades. Tome este tiempo para comenzar a desarrollar una visión para usted mismo, para su hijo o para sus estudiantes. ¿En dónde se ve viviendo usted o su hijo? ¿Trabajando? ¿Pasando el tiempo libre?

Los presentadores lo guiarán a usted a lo largo de esta emocionante jornada y le pueden ayudar a que considere opciones que usted no había pensado antes. Usted saldrá de este taller con una visión diferente para usted o para su hijo(a). 

Familias Abogando: Sue papel en el Comité de Educación Especial (CSE)

Este taller está diseñado para ayudar a los padres y a las familias a fortalecer su papel como defensores en las reuniones y procesos del Comité de Educación Especial (CSE) de sus hijos. Únase con nosotros para hablar sobre el propósito del Comité de Educación Especial (CSE), estrategias de comunicación efectiva, y las maneras como aumentar sus habilidades de abogacía. 

Participación de los Padres

Las familias tienen una mayor influencia en los logros de sus hijos en la escuela y a lo largo de su vida. Las investigaciones muestran que cuando los padres se involucran, los estudiantes tienen calificaciones más altas, mejores puntajes en los exámenes, e índices de graduación más elevados; mejor asistencia en la escuela; aumento en la motivación; mejor auto-estima; y menos índices de suspensión.

Este taller provee a los participantes las herramientas para desarrollar una relación positiva y colaborativa entre las familias y las escuelas. Los participantes aprenderán habilidades para la comunicación efectiva y las estrategias para dar apoyo al éxito en el hogar y en la escuela. 

Pasos para Abogar (interceder o hablar en favor de alguien o de uno mismo) en la Educación 101

Abogar (en inglés Advocacy) es la acción de resolver los problemas con un propósito y una meta. Un padre de familia puede involucrarse para abogar por su hijo (a); una persona con una discapacidad puede abogar por él o por ella mismo(a); un(a) maestro(a) puede abogar por un estudiante; grupos de personas pueden unir sus fuerzas en esfuerzos de abogacía sistémica para cambiar leyes o políticas. Un planteamiento paso-a-paso puede guiarnos hacia los resultados deseados. Independientemente de las circunstancias o del alcance, el proceso de abogar es similar.

Los participantes van a aprender cómo construir una fundación sólida con miembros del equipo para involucrarse en el proceso de abogar. Las actividades prácticas reforzarán los pasos de la abogacía que lleven a obtener el éxito en los resultados.

Apoyo Conductual (Apoyo para el Comportamiento)

Acoso Escolar (Bullying): Estrategias de Intervención

El acoso escolar o bullying es un serio problema que está aumentando en las escuelas. Los padres, los maestros y los niños necesitan apoyo para saber cómo responder. Este taller presenta a los participantes las definiciones de acoso o bullying, cómo reconocerlo, y cómo responder tanto en la casa como en la escuela.

Este taller puede ofrecerse en un formato de una o de dos horas.

Entendimiento y Apoyo para Niños/as con Conductas Difíciles

Conducta en todas las formas, como las expresiones faciales y lenguaje corporal, pueden transmitir mensajes. Este taller explorara la naturaleza de la conducta de un(a) niño(a), algunas posible causas y estrategias para promover conductas positiva. Miraremos varios apoyos y servicios disponibles a través de la escuela y la comunidad, y hablaremos sobre las opciones para cuando se necesite más apoyo.

Intervenciones Conductuales Positivas

La conducta en todas sus formas, como por ejemplo, las expresiones faciales y el lenguaje corporal, pueden transmitir mensajes. Analizar e Interpretar los mensajes expresados por medio de comportamiento problemático es el primer paso para implementar las intervenciones conductuales positivas.

Este taller explorará la naturaleza de la conducta de un(a) niño(a) y ayudará a determinar cuándo es apropiado tener un plan de conducta positiva. Los presentadores discutirán los elementos esenciales de un plan de conducta positiva. Los participantes aprenderán las intervenciones positivas y las estrategias para apoyar a los estudiantes con conductas problemáticas de manera afirmativa y constructiva.

Comunicación y asociaciones (partnership)

El ABC de una Reunión (Conferencia) Escolar

Los miembros de la familia y los profesionales son invitados a asistir a varias reuniones escolares. Los participantes en este taller van a conocer cómo obtener lo máximo de una reunión y cómo ser un miembro del equipo envuelto antes, durante y después de una reunión. El taller ofrecerá sugerencias sobre puntos esenciales para una colaboración, tal como estar preparado e informado. El objetivo principal es que la familia y la escuela trabajen en conjunto para el beneficio de la educación del niño(a). 

Comunicación Efectiva

¿Sale de las reuniones de educación o de las reuniones con el personal sin expresar sus intenciones? ¿O siente como si su punto de vista es mal entendido? ¿Escucha lo que dicen los otros miembros del equipo? ¿Cómo responde?

La comunicación es la clave para la colaboración efectiva. Los participantes fortalecerán sus habilidades de colaboración al aprender las estrategias de comunicación. Los temas incluyen las expresiones verbales y no verbales, los estilos de comunicación, y la formación de equipos. 

Educación Especial (Special Education)

Disciplina y Suspensión: Entender los Derechos de los Estudiantes con Discapacidades

¿Sabía usted que hay una diferencia entre los procedimientos en la disciplina general y los procedimientos en la disciplina para los estudiantes con discapacidades? Los niños con discapacidades tienen derechos específicos bajo las leyes estatales y federales cuando se trata de suspensiones y de disciplina escolar.

Este taller proporcionará una vista en general de estos derechos y procesos usados para la disciplina y las suspensiones. Los participantes aprenderán sobre las Evaluaciones de la Conducta Funcional y cómo crear un plan pro-activo para el manejo de la conducta para evitar conflictos futuros.

Información General sobre el Comité de Educación Especial

El Comité de Educación Especial (CSE por sus siglas en inglés) es responsable de desarrollar un Programa de Educación Individualizada (IEP por sus siglas en inglés) por medio de un proceso que involucra al estudiante y a sus padres. Este taller explicará el propósito que tiene este Comité de Educación Especial (CSE), los miembros requeridos, y el papel de los padres en el comité. Los participantes conocerán estrategias para abogar de manera efectiva con el Comité de Educación Especial (CSE). 

Programa Bilingüe: Una Visión General

El propósito del Programa Bilingüe es el de ayudar al estudiante a desarrollarse académicamente en su lengua de origen y en el idioma inglés. Está diseñado para ayudar al estudiante a aprender inglés mientras continua con las clases en otras áreas académicas, tales como ciencias y matemáticas, en su lengua de origen. Este taller proporciona una idea del proceso inicial para identificar a un estudiante como aprendiz del Idioma Inglés / con Dominio Limitado del Idioma Inglés. También proporciona una visión general de los diferentes componentes del Programa Bilingüe. 

Programas de Educación Individualizada: Puntos Importantes

Cuando un(a) niño(a) califica para recibir servicios de educación especial, la ley federal requiere del desarrollo de un documento, llamado Programa de Educación Individualizada. El IEP (por sus siglas en inglés) sirve como una guía de los servicios, incluyendo la información importante sobre los niveles de desempeño y las necesidades del (la) niño(a), así como también de las metas para el (la) niño(a). Este taller preparará a los participantes para participar activamente en el equipo del Programa de Educación Individualizada (IEP). 

Promoción de la Graduación

El graduarse de la secundaria es una meta importante para todos los estudiantes, incluyendo los estudiantes con discapacidades. Las familias tienen un papel importante en el apoyo de los logros de un estudiante en la escuela. Este taller les provee a los padres con estrategias e información que puede ayudarlos a apoyar a sus hijos. También cubre los porcentajes nacionales de deserción escolar, los porcentajes de graduados del Estado de Nueva York, y los signos de advertencia cuando un estudiante se está distanciado o desconectando de los estudios. 

Respuesta a la intervención (por sus siglas en inglés RtI), 504 y el Programa Educativo Individualizado (por sus siglas en inglés IEP): ¿De qué se tratan?

Cuando un(a) niño (a) califica para los servicios de educación especial, la ley federal requiere el desarrollo de un documento llamado Programa Educativo Individualizado (IEP). Puede ser que algunos estudiantes no califiquen para un programa educativo individualizado (IEP), pero puede que reciban adaptaciones y modificaciones de un Plan 504 o pueden recibir apoyos y servicios por medio de educación general y/o especial. 

Enfoque centrado en la persona y la planeación

Desarrollo de una Visión

Algunas veces es difícil articular los sueños que tenemos para nosotros mismos o para nuestros hijos y estudiantes con discapacidades. Tome este tiempo para comenzar a desarrollar una visión para usted mismo, para su hijo o para sus estudiantes. ¿En dónde se ve viviendo usted o su hijo? ¿Trabajando? ¿Pasando el tiempo libre?

Los presentadores lo guiarán a usted a lo largo de esta emocionante jornada y le pueden ayudar a que considere opciones que usted no había pensado antes. Usted saldrá de este taller con una visión diferente para usted o para su hijo(a).

Necesidades médicas

Organizándose para Abogar por Los Niños con Necesidades Médicas

¿Repite con frecuencia la misma información médica a los diferentes profesionales que cuidan de los niños? Los niños con discapacidades que también tienen necesidades médicas con frecuencia tienen más hospitalizaciones, más tratamientos especializados, y puede ser que reciban apoyo de un(a) enfermero(a) o de otros cuidados especiales. Esto se suma a tener más citas, más información, más papeleo … y más estrés.

Hacer un cuadernillo para anotar lo relacionado con los asuntos médicos, ayuda a darle seguimiento y comunicarles de manera eficiente a los profesionales o a las personas que cuiden a los niños la información médica importante. Este taller ayudará a los participantes a identificar, clasificar y organizar los récords médicos esenciales para facilitar la comunicación con los profesionales médicos y con las otras personas que los cuiden.

Transición

Caminos a la Graduación

Conozca cuáles son “los caminos a la graduación” que están disponibles para los estudiantes con discapacidades en el Estado de Nueva York. ¿Qué ofrece cada diploma, cada acreditación y cada certificado para el futuro del estudiante? ¿Cuál es la diferencia entre un diploma local, un diploma Regents, Acreditación de las Habilidades y los Logros (en inglés Skills and Achievement Commencement Credential), y el Certificado Regents para Estar Listo para la Fuerza Laboral (en inglés: Certificate of Work Readiness)? Este taller le ayudara a usted y a su estudiante a tomar decisiones en base a más información con referencia a la escuela, la colocación y los servicios. 

El Comportamiento Pro-Social La Sexualidad y Las Discapacidades

Enseñarles sobre sexualidad a las personas con discapacidades es importante para promover la independencia, la seguridad personal, los estilos de vida saludables, las relaciones saludables y la inclusión social. Los padres, los guardianes legales y los profesionales saldrán de este taller con la información y la confianza que necesitan para dirigir el tema sobre la sexualidad con los niños, los adolescentes o con los adultos jóvenes con discapacidades. 

Promoción de la Graduación

El graduarse de la secundaria es una meta importante para todos los estudiantes, incluyendo los estudiantes con discapacidades. Las familias tienen un papel importante en el apoyo de los logros de un estudiante en la escuela. Este taller les provee a los padres con estrategias e información que puede ayudarlos a apoyar a sus hijos. También cubre los porcentajes nacionales de deserción escolar, los porcentajes de graduados del Estado de Nueva York, y los signos de advertencia cuando un estudiante se está distanciado o desconectando de los estudios. 


Starbridge supports every individual’s right to choose the living situation that works best for them.

We partner with individuals and families to identify options, navigate systems, and connect to resources.

Close up photo of adult man smiling for camera 

Choose an option to learn more –

 Supervised Residences 
 Supportive Residences
 Community Habilitation (Com Hab) 
 Family Reimbursement Program (FRP) 
 Working with an Advocate

Supervised Residences

Starbridge offers residences that are staffed 24/7 by trained and caring direct-support professionals. Our homes and apartments are located in Brighton, Irondequoit, and Rochester, and are certified by the NYS Office for People with Developmental Disabilities (OPWDD). Supervised residences offer 24/7 support to meet each person’s needs while helping them achieve greater personal independence.

Supportive Residences

Starbridge’s supportive setting offers a high level of living independence, while ensuring assistance from highly trained direct-support professionals. Our staff assists people in identifying the areas in which they would like support to reach a higher level of living independence. Starbridge’s Supportive residences are also certified by the NYS Office for People with Developmental Disabilities (OPWDD).

What are the eligibility requirements for Starbridge residential options?

For all residential services, individuals must meet eligibility criteria through OPWDD.

To get started, use the Contact Us form or call Michelle Farrands at 585-224-7268.

To access our Residential Referral Form, please click here.

Adult woman smiling on summer day 

Community Habilitation (Com Hab)

Starbridge’s Community Habilitation (Com Hab) assists people to achieve goals, to live as independently as possible, and to make their lives meaningful and worthwhile.

How does Com Hab work?

Starbridge offers one-on-one support to adults and young adults with disabilities in increasing or maintaining independence. Our Com Hab counselors provide support as directed by you and your Life Plan. Some examples are:

  • managing your money
  • trying out and shopping for healthy foods
  • increasing exercise
  • obtaining library cards or gym memberships
  • exploring your community
  • volunteering
  • and more!

What are the eligibility requirements for Com Hab?

Participants must meet eligibility criteria through NYS OPWDD, and can live in an independent or a certified setting.

How do you get started?

Use the Contact Us form or call Katie Cannan at 585-224-7211.

To access Starbridge’s Com Hab Referral Form:

 

Young adult man smiling
 

Working with an Advocate

Starbridge Advocates partner with people who have disabilities and their circles of support to identify the individual’s goals, to share information about all available resources, and to empower individuals and families to know their rights and become successful advocates in their own lives. In some cases, a Starbridge Advocate may provide more intensive support as an individual or family works to address specific issues or concerns.

We support every person's right to choose the living situation that works best for them. We partner with individuals and families to identify options, navigate systems, and connect to resources.

Please use the Contact Us form or call us at 585-224-7359 and leave a message for our Intake Coordinator. The Coordinator will call you back to ask for information about you or the person you are calling about (if you are phoning for someone else) and can connect you with further resources or staff.

 


Education opens up opportunities for the future.

At Starbridge, we partner with families, children, youth, and schools to improve educational outcomes and realize possibilities.

mother and teen son 

Choose an option to learn more

 Early childhood (ages birth to 5) 
 School age children and youth (ages 5-26) 
 Transition age youth (ages 14-26) 
 Workshops about special education 
 Resources I can view online 
 I need to speak with someone

 

 

Early Intervention through Preschool (Birth-Age 5)

Parents of infants and toddlers with disabilities can access a variety of supports and services including assistance with diagnosis through the early intervention program administered by the New York State Department of Health

The New York State Education Department has prepared a guide about special education supports for children from birth through 3rd grade – click to open document [pdf]

 

Mother and daughter

 

School Age Children (Age 5-26)

Students who have disabilities or suspected disabilities and are age 5-26 have access to a variety of supports, services, programs and accommodations that allow them to receive an appropriate education that will prepare them for adulthood.

At Starbridge, our staff can provide information about –

  • Federal and state laws and regulations governing the delivery of special education
  • How to navigate school systems and policies
  • Techniques to help you communicate effectively with your child's school team
  • Resources available to assist you

Starbridge staff offer workshops, webinars, and conferences year-round on a variety of education-related topics. To see what we have planned, click for our events calendar.

Please use the Contact Us form or call us at 585-224-7359 and leave a message. Our Intake Coordinator will call you back to ask for information about you or the person you are calling about (if you are phoning for someone else) and can connect you with further resources or staff.

 kids at school bus

 

Working with an Educational Advocate

If you are looking for information or seeking support in addressing educational needs for a student who has a disability or suspected disability, Starbridge Family Education Specialists and Advocates are here for you. We educate and empower you to advocate on behalf of your children. Our goals are to improve educational outcomes and build positive family-school relationships.

Please use the Contact Us form or call us at 585-224-7359 and leave a message. Our Intake Coordinator will call you back to ask for information about you or the person you are calling about (if you are phoning for someone else) and can connect you with further resources or staff.

 

Funding

Starbridge is a Parent Training & Information Center (PTIC), funded by the US Department of Education. Our PTIC provides workshops and resources for families and professionals regarding special education rights and responsibilities, and promotes meaningful involvement of families in their children’s education programs.

Starbridge's PTIC serves all of New York State, except the five boroughs of New York City and Long Island. Our Rochester-based staff serve families in the following counties: Chemung, Livingston, Monroe, Ontario, Schuyler, Seneca, Steuben, Tioga, Wayne and Yates. To speak with one of our Family Education Specialists, please contact us at 585-546-1700 or use the Contact Us form.

For residents in Central New York – Broome, Cayuga, Chenango, Cortland, Delaware, Madison, Onondaga, Otsego, and Tompkins Counties – please contact Kara Georgi, Family Education Specialist serving Central New York, by phone at 315-345-2555 or by email at kgeorgi@starbridgeinc.org.

We contract with Core Community Partners across the state to provide services in these regions –

 

Starbridge is a part of the New York State Parent Network, a collaboration between all federally-funded Parent Centers in the state.

To find your Parent Center in other parts of New York or the USA, go to http://www.parentcenterhub.org/find-your-center/

 

OSEP ideas that work smallStarbridge is a New York State Parent Training and Information Center (PTIC), serving all of New York State except the 5 boroughs of New York City and Long Island. The contents of this website were developed in part under a grant from the US Department of Education, #H328M150079.However, the contents do not necessarily represent the policy of the US Department of Education, and you should not assume endorsement by the Federal Government Project Officer, Carmen Sanchez.


 

Families who have a loved one with a developmental disability living at home often have special expenses or barriers that the typical family does not have.

Starbridge’s Family Support Programs are here to help.

Family Support Programs at Starbridge are funded through the NYS Office for People with Developmental Disabilities (OPWDD).

Find out about –

Support with Transportation
Speak with an Advocate
Family Reimbursement Program
TIES Program - inclusive recreation for youth and young adults
Using Self Direction AND Family Support Services

 

Support with Transportation

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GO MONROE offers financial support and transportation navigation assistance to families who meet eligibility requirements.

What are the eligibility requirements?

  • Family has young or adult children with developmental disabilities living at home in Monroe County, NY
  • AND OPWDD eligibility*
  • AND household income that does not exceed federal poverty guidelines.

Contact us today to learn more! Call Maritza Cubi at 585-224-7327 or email mcubi@starbridgeinc.org

 *If you aren’t sure whether you are eligible through OPWDD, let us know when you call.


Speak with an Advocate

We support every person's right to choose the living situation that works best for them. We partner with people to identify options, navigate systems, know your rights, and connect to resources.

In some cases, a Starbridge Advocate may provide more intensive support as an individual or family works to address specific issues or concerns.

How do you get started?

Please use the Contact Us form or call us at 585-224-7359 and leave a message. Our Intake Coordinator will call you back to ask for information about you or the person you are calling about (if you are phoning for someone else) and can connect you with further resources or staff.

 

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How to use Self Direction AND Family Support Services?

If you or your family member have a self-directed budget, OPWDD requires your budget to cover the cost of any Family Support Services. Contact your support broker or contact us if you have questions about using your budget for these purposes.  

To learn more about Self Direction at Starbridge, visit our Self Directed Services page.